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Posts by LB Carlson

Update on Taxation of Payroll Protection Program (PPP) Loan Forgiveness

On Nov. 18, 2020, the Internal Revenue Service released additional guidance regarding the deductibility of expenses paid using proceeds from a PPP loan. The new guidance states that if a taxpayer received a PPP loan and paid or incurred usually deductible expenses with the loan proceeds, those expenses are not deductible if the taxpayer has a reasonable expectation that they will receive forgiveness. The expenses paid for with PPP loan proceeds are not deductible in the year paid even if forgiveness has not been achieved or applied for by the end of the taxable year. In other words, the expenses are not deductible on taxpayers’ income tax returns that include the covered period. The covered period is either the 8- or 24-week period you elected to spend the loan proceeds.

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Surviving Adversity: A CEO Panel Discussion

In a recent Printing Industry Midwest (PIM) Financial Executives Council webinar, a panel of CEOs from several Minnesota printers got together to discuss surviving the adversity, the state of the graphic arts industry, how it’s been impacted, and where to go from here.  

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Payroll records

Now more than ever, carefully track payroll records

The subject of payroll has been top-of-mind for business owners this year. The COVID-19 pandemic triggered economic changes that caused considerable fluctuations in the size of many companies’ workforces. Employees have been laid off, furloughed and, in some cases, rehired. There has also been crisis relief for eligible businesses in the form of the Paycheck Protection Program and the payroll tax credit. Payroll recordkeeping was important in the “old normal,” but it’s even more important now as businesses continue to navigate their way through a slowly recovering economy and ongoing public health crisis.

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Tax Records

What tax records can you throw away?

October 15 is the deadline for individual taxpayers who extended their 2019 tax returns. (The original April 15 filing deadline was extended this year to July 15 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.) If you’re finally done filing last year’s return, you might wonder: Which tax records can you toss once you’re done? Now is a good time to go through old tax records and see what you can discard.

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Protect your money

Why it’s important to plan for income taxes as part of your estate plan

As a result of the current estate tax exemption amount ($11.58 million in 2020), many estates no longer need to be concerned with federal estate tax. Before 2011, a much smaller amount resulted in estate plans attempting to avoid it. Now, because many estates won’t be subject to estate tax, more planning can be devoted to saving income taxes for your heirs.

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Weighing the risks

Weighing the risks vs. rewards of a mezzanine loan

To say that most small to midsize businesses have at least considered taking out a loan this year would probably be an understatement. The economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has lowered many companies’ revenue but may have also opened opportunities for others to expand or pivot into more profitable areas.

If your company needs working capital to grow, rather than simply survive, you might want to consider a mezzanine loan. These arrangements offer relatively quick access to substantial funding but with risks that you should fully understand before signing on the dotted line.

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Employee health care

Helping employees understand their health care accounts

Many businesses now offer, as part of their health care benefits, various types of accounts that reimburse employees for medical expenses on a tax-advantaged basis. These include health Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs), Health Reimbursement Arrangement (HRAs) and Health Savings Account (HSAs, which are usually offered in conjunction with a high-deductible health plan).

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Social Security tax

Will You Have to Pay Tax on Your Social Security Benefits?

If you’re getting close to retirement, you may wonder: Are my Social Security benefits going to be taxed? And if so, how much will you have to pay? It depends on your other income. If you’re taxed, between 50% and 85% of your benefits could be taxed. (This doesn’t mean you pay 85% of your benefits back to the government in taxes. It merely that you’d include 85% of them in your income subject to your regular tax rates.)

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Education Tax Breaks

Back-to-school tax breaks on the books

Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, students are going back to school this fall, either remotely, in-person or under a hybrid schedule. In any event, parents may be eligible for certain tax breaks to help defray the cost of education.

Here is a summary of some of the tax breaks available for education.

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